Category: college football

College football – This Just In

Honey badgers are known to scrap with animals many times their size, including lions, and even tangle (successfully) with poisonous snakes.

“This is a very difficult day for our team,” head coach Les Miles said. We are going to miss him.”. “We lose a quality person, teammate and contributor to the program. He also has four picks, 11 forced fumbles and eight fumble recoveries, as well as four touchdowns, two on punt returns and two on fumble returns.

The 5-foot-9, 175-pound Mathieu got his nickname for his fearlessness on the gridiron. We will do what we can as coaches, teammates, and friends to get him on a path where he can have success. However, with that being said, we have a standard that our players are held to and when that standard is not met, there are consequences.”

The sports network had to add an editor’s note, saying, “This story was published prior to Tyrann Mathieu’s dismissal from LSU’s football program on August 10.”

LSU did not say which team rule Mathieu broke. because the honey badger takes what it wants, and Tyrann takes what he wants on the field,” ESPN reported today in a profile.

According to LSU, the Columbus, Ohio, native who attended high school in New Orleans, has registered 133 tackles – 16 for a loss – in 26 games for the Tigers.

Despite missing the game, Mathieu was still a finalist for the Heisman Trophy, awarded to college football’s best player, as a sophomore. The 20-year-old All-American ran into trouble last year when he and two other players violated the team’s drug policy. In addition to winning the Chuck Bednarik Award, given to the top defensive player, he came in fifth in Heisman voting with 34 first-place votes and was the only defensive player among 10 finalists.

It’s been said that Honey Badger don’t care, but what may be more accurate is that Honey Badger don’t play – at least not for the LSU Tigers.

Mathieu and the others were suspended for their team’s game against Auburn.

Said the Dallas Cowboys’ Morris Claiborne, a former teammate of Mathieu’s: “Tyrann deserved the nickname … ESPN reported at the time that the trio tested positive for synthetic marijuana.

The team, which played in last year’s national college football championship game, announced this afternoon that their top player and arguably the nation’s best cornerback, Tyrann Mathieu, has been dismissed for violating team policy.

Miles added, “It’s hard because we all love Tyrann

Alabama’s Nick Saban says satellite camps are ‘bad for college football’

There have been no specific guidelines relative to how we’re managing control of this stuff. If they have a prospect, they can have a camp. “I’m not into politics.”

“Someone sponsors the camp, they pay them the money. “That’s why we have a combine and all these other things. “By doing what we’re doing now, we’re doing what we do in every other sport that we’re complaining about every day — AAU basketball and all this.

“I don’t have a candidate,” Saban said. “That’s what it’s about.

“I’m not blaming Jim Harbaugh,” Saban said.

“If you ask the NFL, ‘How can we maintain trust with our players when you’re giving us inaccurate information?’ their response is, ‘We don’t know enough about the guys to really give you the information, because all we can really go on is film evaluation,’” Saban said at the SEC annual meetings. “It’s as good of [high school] football as there is in the country.”

Among other topics Saban touched upon Tuesday, he said he would like to see underclassmen who leave school early have the option of returning after testing their prospects for the NFL draft, similar to what happens in college basketball.

Under current NCAA rules, once underclassmen declare for the NFL draft, they lose their remaining eligibility.

Saban has the opposite viewpoint on satellite camps as Michigan coach Jim Harbaugh, who has embraced them like no other coach.

Saban blasted satellite camps because they incorporate third parties into recruiting and there aren’t any guidelines.. However, in April the NCAA overturned the ban and ruled that satellite camps would be allowed.

Florida coach Jim McElwain has a unique perspective because 10 of the SEC’s other 13 schools participate in satellite camps in the Sunshine State.

“Why should we be promoting anybody else’s camp anywhere? All we’re doing is allowing all these other people that we spend all of our time at the NCAA saying you can’t recruit through a third-party person, and that’s exactly what you’re doing.

Saban has never been a fan of satellite camps, characterizing them as “ridiculous.”

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report. We want accurate information when that’s all said and done in December.”

Saban and Arkansas’ Bret Bielema believe a combine for underclassmen could help solve the problem. It would be similar to pro days for juniors and seniors and would allow NFL scouts to better evaluate those players.

“They should come [to Florida],” McElwain said. What do they do with the money? And who makes sure the kid paid to go to camp?

The SEC had banned its coaches from participating in satellite camps, and the NCAA followed with a satellite-camp ban. It’s happening outside the normal evaluation window, which means we’re taking time away from our players. We have to worry about our players doing the right things with the limited time we have them, but we’re not going to do that because we have to be somewhere else to see someone else.”

Saban was asked whom he would want as commissioner.

“It’s bad for college football,” Saban said.

“Creating all these third parties. But what’s best for the game of college football. Then you’re expected to go to that camp and they can use you to promote their camp because Ohio State is coming, Alabama is coming, whoever else is coming.

After initially saying he would not discuss satellite camps, Saban went off in a five-minute rant that would have made Howard Beale proud, comparing the satellite camps to “the wild, wild West.”

“All the people that say this is creating opportunities for kids, this is all about recruiting,” Saban said. The integrity of the game.

“Until this satellite camp issue came up, you still had to go to the high school, go through the coach, and players came to your camp if they were interested in learning,” Saban said. Harbaugh can do whatever he wants to do if he thinks that’s what’s best. There needs to be somebody who looks out for what’s best for the game, not the SEC or the Big Ten or Jim Harbaugh. There needs to be a [college football] commissioner.”

McElwain obviously would prefer that other schools didn’t recruit in Florida, but he knows that’s not realistic.

“Anybody can have a camp now.

“This is the wild, wild West at its best. And who gets exposed on that? I go to a camp and talk to some guy I don’t know from Adam’s house cat, and he’s representing some kid cause he’s putting a camp on, and then I’m in trouble for talking to this guy.”

Saban also questioned who keeps track of whether players paid for the camps and what, if any, compliance people are involved.

MIRAMAR BEACH, Florida — Alabama coach Nick Saban made one thing crystal clear Tuesday at the SEC spring meetings: He is not a fan of satellite camps.

“The coaches, players and people who play it. “I’m saying it’s bad for college football. Now who does that? Now because we have the Power 5, everyone is doing what they want. That’s bigger than all this